lunes, 30 de abril de 2012

Memorial honour at last for Duke of Wellington's hero... two centuries after his death



El siguiente artículo apareció en el periódico "This is Somerset" de Inglaterra:

Monday, April 30, 2012
A Grenadier Guards officer who died fighting for the Duke of Wellington two centuries ago is to receive a 10,000 euro (£8,175) memorial in the Spanish town where he was laid to rest.
Lieutenant Colonel John Scrope Colquitt of the First Foot Guards died of fever in either Seville or nearby Utrera, Spain, on September 4, 1812, after fighting Napoleon’s troops in temperatures of 40 degrees during the Peninsular War.
On May 5, a memorial will be unveiled in the neighbouring town of Alcala de Guadaira at the site where Lieutenant Colonel Colquitt was buried, as a member of the Grenadier Guards in full regimental uniform sounds the Last Post on the bugle.


The monument will be situated in a part of town known as La Cruz del Ingles (the Englishman’s Cross) after the cross which once stood over Lieutenant Colonel Colquitt’s grave.
Its inauguration comes as Spain commemorates the bi-centenary of events in the Peninsular War, which pitted the allied nations of Britain, Spain and Portugal against Napoleonic France and lasted from 1808 to 1814. Relatives of the soldier will travel from Britain to join local historians, dignitaries and representatives of the Grenadier Guards.
Among them will be psychologist and author Sam Westmacott, who only discovered she was Lieutenant Colonel Colquitt’s cousin five times removed when a local history group investigating his story contacted her.
Mrs Westmacott (nee Colquitt-Craven), who is from Watchet, Somerset, said: “It is fantastic the Spanish people are honouring this relative of mine that I did not even know about.
"It has really brought the families that are related to John Scrope Colquitt together – I have met cousins I did not know existed and the funny thing is that we are pretty much alike. About half a dozen of us will be going over to Spain and even my ex-husband, who was a Grenadier Guard himself, has lobbed in £100 to help pay for the visit.
“We are all going to go to this wonderful ceremony and then go and drink several bottles of champagne to John Scrope Colquitt’s memory. This memorial will remind people of the tremendous history of the Grenadier Guards.”
The story of how Lieutenant Colonel Colquitt’s remains came to rest in Alcala de Guadaira and the origins of the name “the Englishman’s Cross” have only recently emerged from the mists of time.
Born in 1775 in Liverpool, he was the son of the city’s bailiff and studied at Rugby public school and Trinity College, Cambridge, before joining the elite Foot Guards regiment as an ensign. There is still a Colquitt Street in Liverpool town centre which bears witness to the power the family once had there.
During the Iberian campaign, Lieutenant Colonel Colquitt fought the French in the liberation of Cadiz and then led his men into battle in Seville on April 27, 1812.
Upon his demise a few days later, members of his battalion carried their 37-year-old leader’s remains to Alcala de Guadaira, where they were stationed. They asked the locals for a Christian service and burial, but the Spanish would not allow his body to be laid to rest in the town’s cemetery because he was an Anglican “heathen”.

domingo, 29 de abril de 2012

The Birmingham Mail, Friday 27th April 2012




Grenadier Guard Lance Corporal George Vickers, 22, who is charged with sounding the Last Post during a memorial service on May 5 in Alcala de Guadaira, for Lieutenant Colonel John Scrope Colquitt of the First Foot Guards. PA.

The Metro, London 27th April 2012

Memorial service for Grenadier Guard

Grenadier Guard Lance Corporal George Vickers, 22, who is charged with sounding the Last Post during a memorial service on May 5 in Alcala de Guadaira, for Lieutenant Colonel John Scrope Colquitt of the First Foot Guards who died of fever in either Seville or nearby Utrera, Spain, on September 4, 1812 after fighting Napoleon's troops in temperatures of 40 degrees during the Peninsular War. 26/04/2012


Este anuncio salío en el Metro de Londres el viernes 27 de abril 2012

sábado, 28 de abril de 2012

Gibraltar Chronicle, Friday April 27th 2012


Memorial for officer 200 years on

Grenadier Guard Lance Corporal George Vickers, 22, who is charged with sounding the Last Post during a memorial service on May 5 in Alcala de Guadaira.



A Grenadier Guards officer who died fighting for the Duke of Wellington two centuries ago is to receive a 10,000 euro (£8,175) memorial in the Spanish town where he was laid to rest.
Lieutenant Colonel John Scrope Colquitt of the First Foot Guards died of fever in either Seville or nearby Utrera, Spain, on September 4, 1812 after fighting Napoleon’s troops in temperatures of 40 degrees during the Peninsular War.

On May 5, a memorial will be unveiled in the neighbouring town of Alcala de Guadaira at the site where Lt Col Colquitt was buried, as a member of the Grenadier Guards in full regimental uniform sounds the Last Post on the bugle.

The monument will be situated in a part of town known as La Cruz del Ingles (the Englishman’s Cross) after the cross which once stood over Lt Col Colquitt’s grave.

Its inauguration comes as Spain commemorates the bi-centenary of events in the Peninsular War, which pitted the allied nations of Britain, Spain and Portugal against Napoleonic France and lasted from 1808 to 1814.

Relatives of the soldier will travel from Britain to join local historians, dignitaries and representatives of the Grenadier Guards.

Among them will be psychologist and author Sam Westmacott, who only discovered she was Lt Col Colquitt’s cousin five times removed when a local history group investigating his story contacted her.

The story of how Lt Col Colquitt’s remains came to rest in Alcala de Guadaira and the origins of the name “the Englishman’s Cross” have only recently emerged from the mists of time.

Born in 1775 in Liverpool, he was the son of the city’s bailiff and studied at Rugby public school and Trinity College, Cambridge, before joining the elite Foot Guards regiment as an ensign.

During the Iberian campaign, Lt Col Colquitt fought the French in the liberation of Cadiz and then led his men into battle in Seville on April 27 1812.

Upon his demise a few days later, members of his battalion carried their 37-year-old leader’s remains to Alcala de Guadaira, where they were stationed.

They asked the locals for a Christian service and burial, but the Spanish would not allow his body to be laid to rest in the town’s cemetery because he was an Anglican “heathen”.

Instead they offered a stone cross as a burial site on a hill outside the town.

An eccentric Scottish adventurer and friend of Lt Col Colquitt, Lieutenant Colonel John Downie, later went to the town and carved a tombstone under the cross.

As Alcala de Guadaira expanded over the decades, the cross and Lt Col Colquitt’s remains were moved elsewhere.

 

martes, 24 de abril de 2012

DO YOU WANT TO MEET ME?



DO YOU WANT TO MEET ME? I’LL BE IN THE PLAZUELA IN ALCALÁ DE GUADAÍRA ON SATURDAY 5TH MAY 2012 AT 11.30 AM AT THE INAUGURATION OF THE CRUZ DEL INGLÉS.

¿QUIERES CONOCERME? ESTARÉ EN LA PLAZUELA EN ALCALÁ DE GUADAIRA EL SÁBADO 5 DE MAYO A LAS 11.30 DE LA MAÑANA EN LA INAUGURACIÓN DE LA CRUZ DEL INGLÉS.

domingo, 22 de abril de 2012

Happy St George's Day


Inauguración del monumento del bicentenario en Badajoz, sábado 21 de abril 2012


LA SECUENCIA
1807: Napoleón invade España y obliga a la familia Real española a trasladarse a Francia.
2 de mayo de 1808: Madrid se levanta contra los franceses. Unos días después llega a Badajoz la proclama del alcalde de Móstoles que pide luchar contra la ocupación.
Mayo 1808: El conde de Torre del Fresno, gobernador de Badajoz, pide tropas para luchar contra los franceses. Sin embargo, unas semanas después los pacenses le acusan de afrancesado y montan una revuelta en la que lo matan en la calle.
1809: El general francés Víctor se sitúa en Mérida para tomar Badajoz, un enclave estratégico.
Enero de 1811: El mariscal francés Soult inicia el sitio a Badajoz colocando su artillería en los cerros. Defiende la ciudad con éxito el general Menacho, pero el 11 de febrero muere por un cañonazo en el baluarte de Santiago y solo 6 días después la ciudad se rinde y los galos entran.
Mayo de 1811: Un ejercito angloportugués acude para recuperar Badajoz y se produce la Batalla de La Albuera contra los franceses. Hay grandes pérdidas y los galos mantienen Badajoz, pero al menos los ingleses paran el avance francés hacia Andalucía.
16 de marzo de 1812: el Duque de Wellington inicia el asedio a Badajoz para quitársela a los galos.
6 y 7 de abril de 1812: Tras varios intentos frustrados Wellington abre tres brechas en la muralla, se produce una gran batalla y los franceses se rinden. Los ingleses han tomado Badajoz y la liberan.
ALBERTO GONZÁLEZ CRONISTA DE BADAJOZ
«Fue un punto de inflexión en la guerra. Badajoz era una plaza decisiva, la llave de la frontera»
ÁLVARO MELÉNDEZ HISTORIADOR MILITAR
«Para la ciudad supuso el final de la guerra y para los ingleses el vuelco definitivo en la campaña»





The Grenadier Guards


We are very pleased to announce that Corporal George Vickers from the Band of the Grenadier Guards will be attending the inauguration ceremony of the monument of the Cruz del Inglés on Saturday May 5th 2012 in Alcalá de Guadaíra. He will play "Reveille"  and "The Last Post". The Band of the Grenadier Guards takes part in many of the military occasions at Buckingham Palace and Saint James Palace in London.

Nos complace anunciar que el cabo George Vickers de la banda de los Grenadier Guards asistirá a la ceremonia de inauguración del monumento de la Cruz del Inglés el sábado 5 de mayo 2012 en Alcalá de Guadaíra. Tocará  el toque de diana y el toque de retreta. La banda de los Grenadier Guards participa en numerosos eventos militares en el palacio de Buckingham y en el palacio de Saint James en Londres.

A Grenadier Guard parade in London/ un desfile de los Grenadier en Londres   

miércoles, 18 de abril de 2012

Saturday 5th May 2012/ sábado 5 de mayo 2012 Inauguration of monument in La Cruz del Inglés/ Inauguración del monumento en La Cruz del Inglés





THE OFFICIAL INAUGURATION OF THE MONUMENT TO JOHN SCROPE COLQUITT, "THE ENGLISH CROSS" WILL BE ON SATURDAY MAY 5TH 2012


LA INAUGURACIÓN OFICIAL DEL MONUMENTO A JOHN SCROPE COLQUITT , "LA CRUZ DEL INGLÉS", TENDRÁ LUGAR EL SÁBADO 5 DE MAYO  2012

martes, 17 de abril de 2012

A New Monument to the Sieges of Badajoz 1811-12 to be Dedicated at the Santa Maria Bastion on 21st April 2012/ Inauguración del monumento en Badajoz 21 de abril 2012




 On 21st April 2012, to coincide with the bicentenary of the Peninsular War, an obelisk monument to the memory of the heroic and tragic acts which accompanied the sieges of Badajoz in 1811-12 will be dedicated in the presence of dignitaries from France, Portugal, Spain, and the United Kingdom as well as supporters of The British Cemetery at Elvas.

All of those who perished, irrespective of their nationality, rank or social status, soldiers or civilians, deserve to be remembered. This then will be a monument in memory of all of those who lost their lives in “The Sieges of Badajoz”. A monument that will be the focus for all to remember those difficult and turbulent times as well as serving as a reminder of the important historical significance of the terrible sieges of 1811 and 1812.
Erected at the site of the Santa Maria Bastion at Badajoz the monument (obelisk) is 6.75m high and designed by Estanislao García Olivares, a well-known and renowned local sculptor in Badajoz, whose works include the statue of Ibn Marwan (founder of the city) and the large ‘horse statue’ of Alfonso VIII in Plasencia.

The obelisk is to consist of 4 sides; each dedicated to one of the four principal countries involved: Spain, United Kingdom, Portugal and France. Each face will have a bronze plaque, 50 x 50 cm, with the same text in the country’s language below the national insignia/coat of arms. The obelisk will be made of silver/yellow coloured granite, with a diameter of 30 cm, and will be cut at Eleuterio Deogracias’s quarry at Quintana de la Serena (Badajoz).

The following text will appear on the English plaque:

In 1811 and 1812, during the Peninsular War, Badajoz and its surroundings saw the most glorious and fearful actions of which man is capable. These now legendary events have inspired thousands of pages of history.

domingo, 8 de abril de 2012

HAPPY EASTER

                                                               Happy Easter!

                                                Hotcross bun (típico dulce inglés de la Semana Santa)